1. 07:06 15th Feb 2014

    Notes: 12720

    Reblogged from horrorfetish

    just added this to netflix too :D

    just added this to netflix too :D

    (Source: maggie--hart)

     
  2. 13:20 14th Feb 2014

    Notes: 16

    Reblogged from misspygy

    Top Films of 2013 #1 - The Act of Killing dir. Joshua Oppenheimer

    If I had to sum this film in a few words it would be “disturbing, haunting, unerving, and tragic”. I don’t even have a reference to compare this film to, it was draining to watch. Afterwards I needed to just take a break and chill out.

     
  3. 09:02

    Notes: 35065

    Reblogged from symphonyno6

    karenhallion:

    missanniehall:

    Galaxy Quest (1999)

    I had originally not wanted to see Galaxy Quest because I heard that it was making fun of Star Trek. Then Jonathan Frakes rang me up and said ‘You must not miss this movie! See it on a Saturday night in a full theater.’ And I did, and of course I found it was brilliant. Brilliant. No one laughed louder or longer in the cinema than I did. - Patrick Stewart

    YESSSS. 
    I need to do a Galaxy Quest design….

     
  4. 13:23 12th Feb 2014

    Notes: 5259

    Reblogged from mcastimovies

    jessepnkman:

    Marlon Brando wardrobe tests for A Streetcar Named Desire

     
  5. 11:35 11th Feb 2014

    Notes: 71422

    Reblogged from symphonyno6

    “I’m tough, I’m ambitious, and I know exactly what I want. If that makes me a bitch, okay.” - Favorite female-led/feministic non-romantic comedies (inspired by this x)

    (Source: iheart-stonefield)

     
  6. 09:44 9th Feb 2014

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from princessjinx

    The cinema is not an art which films life: the cinema is something between art and life. Unlike painting and literature, the cinema both gives to life and takes from it, and I try to render this concept in my films. Literature and painting both exist as art from the very start; the cinema doesn’t.
    — Jean-Luc Godard (via comolamiel)
     
  7. 11:14 4th Feb 2014

    Notes: 5655

    Reblogged from coeurdelhistoire

    nitratediva:

This is a film studio in Paris. The year is 1905. Can you spot the director?
I’ll give you a hint. She’s wearing a corset. 
The woman silhouetted in the center foreground is Alice Guy, the world’s first female filmmaker and head of production at Gaumont. Unfortunately, we can’t hear what she’s saying to the cast and crew, but if you watch this entire clip, you will see her arranging actors and turning on music to help them dance in time.

    nitratediva:

    This is a film studio in Paris. The year is 1905. Can you spot the director?

    I’ll give you a hint. She’s wearing a corset. 

    The woman silhouetted in the center foreground is Alice Guy, the world’s first female filmmaker and head of production at Gaumont. Unfortunately, we can’t hear what she’s saying to the cast and crew, but if you watch this entire clip, you will see her arranging actors and turning on music to help them dance in time.

     
  8. 04:40 25th Jan 2014

    Notes: 85

    Reblogged from spectaculardistractions

    Tags: le joli mai

     
  9. 23:13 24th Jan 2014

    Notes: 11

    Reblogged from robertfrenay

    Tags: chris marker

    Godard nailed it once and for all: at the cinema, you raise your eyes to the screen; in front of the television, you lower them. Then there is the role of the shutter. Out of the two hours you spend in a movie theater, you spend one in the dark. It’s this nocturnal portion that stays with us, that ‘fixes’ our memory of a film (the way you fix color on a canvas) in a different way from the same film seen on a television or on a monitor.
    — 

    Chris Marker, director of La Jetée, Le Joli Mai, and Sans Soleil.

    Full disclosure: he goes on to say how exhilarated he’d been by a recent viewing of An American in Paris on his iBook, so maybe we’re all just acting romantic for the hell of it.

    (via robertfrenay)

     
  10. 23:12

    Notes: 137

    Reblogged from keyframedaily

    Tags: le joli mai

    image: Download

    keyframedaily:

Reviews + trailer.

While watching this, I was thinking about how I originally made this blog to post my random thoughts and not bother my followers on my main blog. I wanted to be able to flesh out ideas, jot down memories, some dumb as babies and some just waxing on film critic wanna bes…
I think I will add this to my new years resolutions, to talk more about the films, and how they affected me.
I went to see this at the cinematheque - my fist time in Cleveland.
I of course loved the Cleo 5 a 7, Marienbad, and Fantomas stuff, and I couldn’t help but think of the Battle of Algiers and a few other films. It was really clearly Michel Legrand music as well which I liked.
I had a lot of strange thoughts; it’s quite long. There was one woman I really disliked, sitting inside with another woman who read the Gossip column and said she didn’t think women should vote and such. And I loved the short haired woman even though she said some stuff I found silly - her passion was wonderful and she didn’t let that snarky rich hipster kid derail her. 
I was also intrigued by the black kid they interviewed - I loved his story about tearing up the history book at the religious school and I would love to see what he did with his life. I think he was able to convey things without saying them. I feel like he was so incredibly bright and intelligent and that the society he was living in just couldn’t see that - in fact that they didn’t want to see much of anything. 
I was also very intrigued by some of the things said by the two white inventors or engineers at the table talking about work
It was an enjoyable film experience

    keyframedaily:

    Reviews + trailer.

    While watching this, I was thinking about how I originally made this blog to post my random thoughts and not bother my followers on my main blog. 
    I wanted to be able to flesh out ideas, jot down memories, some dumb as babies and some just waxing on film critic wanna bes…

    I think I will add this to my new years resolutions, to talk more about the films, and how they affected me.

    I went to see this at the cinematheque - my fist time in Cleveland.

    I of course loved the Cleo 5 a 7, Marienbad, and Fantomas stuff, and I couldn’t help but think of the Battle of Algiers and a few other films. It was really clearly Michel Legrand music as well which I liked.

    I had a lot of strange thoughts; it’s quite long. There was one woman I really disliked, sitting inside with another woman who read the Gossip column and said she didn’t think women should vote and such. And I loved the short haired woman even though she said some stuff I found silly - her passion was wonderful and she didn’t let that snarky rich hipster kid derail her. 

    I was also intrigued by the black kid they interviewed - I loved his story about tearing up the history book at the religious school and I would love to see what he did with his life. I think he was able to convey things without saying them. I feel like he was so incredibly bright and intelligent and that the society he was living in just couldn’t see that - in fact that they didn’t want to see much of anything. 

    I was also very intrigued by some of the things said by the two white inventors or engineers at the table talking about work

    It was an enjoyable film experience